Mainly Concerning a Hobbit – Notes

The idea of mixing up elves and hobbits was the biggest one for me, when I started to actually think about putting pen to paper and write about my toons. In LotR and The Hobbit, the focus is mostly on Hobbits and Men, and Hobbits and Dwarves, respectively. Of lesser importance are the ancient bonds between the Elves and the Race of Man, and the mild (sometimes not so mild) enmity between the Elves and the Dwarves. Hobbits and Elves are kind of the polar opposites of the spectrum, and I wanted to see what they were like when put together.

The neat thing about hobbits, and about writing from their perspective, is that the whole wide world really is new to them. From a narrative perspective, writing from Brassica’s point of view is cake.  Also essential to hobbits, I think, is the same theme that drove both The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, which I render as follows: at the end of the day, despite being timid little beasties who need a meal every half-hour, and generally wallowing in determined ignorance about the world at large, hobbits get shit done.

Now, the neat thing about elves (and something I wanted to highlight about Celebarad in particular) is that, well, maybe not all of them know everything. Certainly some of them do, and Beldrieth is probably going to be a good example of that. But something surprised me when I went stumbling along the Volume II Epic, out of Moria into the Golden Wood of Lorien for the first time. They throw an elf NPC at you, and he doesn’t speak the common tongue. Not that he has a lot to say outside of “Please, don’t let these orcs kill me”, but still. Lorien’s an isolated place, and elves are pretty self-absorbed.

I like the idea that a seven-hundred year old elf could be just as sheltered as a just-barely-of-age hobbit. A nourishing little tidbit about the stories of these two characters at large–as we will eventually find out about Celebarad, once he learns enough words in the Common Tongue to explain for himself–both of them went out into the world for pretty much the same reason.

Here’s a handful of other assorted miscellany about the process of putting this piece together!

  • I probably know Bullroarer’s Sward as well as anybody by now, and you know what, that damn bluff is too high to be a reasonable distance to fall. But, shhh, it’s okay. Go there! Poke around. I think it’s a neat little spot.
  • I love Mustard’s name. If I ever do a character post about Brassica, I’ll explain in greater depth.
  • My favourite part of the piece is the thought of hobbits not knowing how to respond to a crisis in any way other than making a lot of food. My family is much the same way.
  • Apparently there’s a sandcastle somewhere in the dunes. I didn’t find it.
  • The screenshot I took of Brassica running with the goblin after her took many attempts. I’m not too good at screenshottery. Thankfully, the dread that resulted from her eventual death (poor thing’s only level 20) helped set the tone of the screenshot. Which was actually taken in daylight, in game. But it’s shady under those trees.
  • That’s right, she’s only 20. So, uh, I don’t know much about being a warden, really. Neither does Brassica, so I suppose we’ll learn  together. On deeper thought, it’s a shame the party doesn’t consist of a Guard, a Cappy, and a Hunter, to make up the three elements of the warden class. Or so I speculate, as someone who knows nothing about being a warden.

Thanks to you for reading,

~Bel

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10 Comments

  1. Okeg of Dwarrowdelf

     /  January 27, 2012

    “…at the end of the day, despite being timid little beasties who need a meal every half-hour, and generally wallowing in determined ignorance about the world at large, hobbits get shit done.”

    Best summary ever.

    Reply
    • preludeinz

       /  January 27, 2012

      Well, think about Adso Haybank. Dude had brigand problems. “Hey, passing adventurer! I got bidness what needs doing around here, and there is an…impediment. Murder some dudes for me. No, no, just get to it. I’ll tell you when to stop.” And Hob Hillbrow in Dwaling. I proudly wear the title “Servant of Process” on account of how absolutely chilling the descriptor in the tool tip is:
      Let it be known to all Men, Elves, Dwarves, and Hobbits (hereinafter ‘the Free Peoples’) that Will Tuffin, being of suitable age and discretion and found within the boundaries of the Shire, has been served with process in accordance with applicable law and with all due diligence by the bearer of this title. The complainant, Hob Hillbrow, seeks reasonably foreseeable damages as well as exemplary damages, if it please the Court. Respectfully submitted by a servant of process in the case.

      That is hobbit-legalese for “I have had your ass murdered.”

      I mean, it doesn’t fit in with twee and lovely aspect of Tolkien that’s manifested primarily in hobbits, but the notion satisfies a dark little corner of the mind; that in service of keeping everything prim and proper and polite, hobbits will authorize extreme and prejudicial violence.

      Reply
      • DarkJackal

         /  March 24, 2012

        “I mean, it doesn’t fit in with twee and lovely aspect of Tolkien that’s manifested primarily in hobbits, but the notion satisfies a dark little corner of the mind; that in service of keeping everything prim and proper and polite, hobbits will authorize extreme and prejudicial violence.”

        I like them more and more each day!! I will admit, I have not done most of the Shire quests *gasp*, but it appears I’m really missing out!

        I think Thorin and Co. must have hired hobbit lawyers to write the contract for Bilbo.

  2. That is hobbit-legalese for “I have had your ass murdered.”

    I laughed so hard… at work. 😛

    I did that quest on each of my alts, and the text completion billboard at the end made me laugh every single time, something like “The complaint has been served”. Every single time, I said to myself “You got served.”

    Reply
  3. Salana

     /  March 5, 2012

    That is hobbit-legalese for “I have had your ass murdered.” <—–It took me a bit to explain to the missus why I was laughing so hard.

    And, I found the sandcastle! It's not actually in the dunes, it's on the same island with Dwight the Explorer.
    But, it does exist. 🙂

    Reply
    • preludeinz

       /  March 5, 2012

      I actually saw it recently myself! I went questing with my sister’s guard–her idea of questing is “let’s see if we can swim out to the middle of the lake”, and she found the sandcastle purely by accident. It’s super cute, and I was really pleased to get the Dwight Deed opened up as well 🙂

      Reply
      • DarkJackal

         /  March 24, 2012

        Ah, I see you found your castle already 🙂 Now there is suppose to be a snowman, somewhere in the Misty mountains I hear? Never seen it.

      • preludeinz

         /  March 25, 2012

        *gasp* That’s meeeeeean! Well, now I need to go find it. The only toon level appropriate for the MM at the moment is the RK, and he’s going to get himself murdered XD I’ll have to pester my sister and her guard. It’ll probably motivate her if I tell her there’s a snowman we need to find 😉

  4. DarkJackal

     /  March 24, 2012

    “Also essential to hobbits, I think, is the same theme that drove both The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, which I render as follows: at the end of the day, despite being timid little beasties who need a meal every half-hour, and generally wallowing in determined ignorance about the world at large, hobbits get shit done.”

    That is sooo funny, and true!

    Thanks for the these notes! I love hearing about the creation process.

    That sandcastle is on an island in the middle of Lake Everswim. Unless there is another one?

    Reply
  1. Welcome from CSTM! « The Hobbits in the Stories

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